Friday, March 30, 2018

Poetry Friday - A Snowflake


It’s Friday! And you know what that means: Poetry! Want to know more about Poetry Friday? Click this link right here. And be sure to check out Heidi Mordhorst's blog, My Juicy Little Universe, to see this week’s round up of wonderful poetry related posts, blogs and goodness. 
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Hello Poetry Friday Friends! We're in the tail end of spring break here. It has been a fun week of relaxing and sleeping in (a little--the toddler doesn't understand that concept yet).

I've been meaning to share a little poem my 8 year old daughter brought home, but I kept forgetting to ask her permission. She brought it home back in the middle of December so it has a sort of winter feel. I told her I'd let her know what everyone thinks, so be sure to leave her a little note in the comments if you have a second. 



A Snowflake
by Samantha Herzog

A Snowflake is a
Warm cuddle from my mom
In the cool morning



Friday, March 23, 2018

Poetry Friday - Golden Shovel


It’s Friday! And you know what that means: Poetry! Want to know more about Poetry Friday? Click this link right here. And be sure to check out Laura Purdie Salas' blog, Writing the World for Kids, to see this week’s round up of wonderful poetry related posts, blogs and goodness. 
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Happy Friday, everyone! The wonderful Laura Purdie Salas, who is hosting this week's round up, is one of the "elite 8" authletes still in the Madness! So be sure to check out her firefighter poem!

By way of announcement, I have revealed my theme for the April A-Z Blogging Challenge. This will be my first year and I've decided to collaborate with my eight-year-old daughter and write 26 flash fiction stories for kids. You can read more about my theme here.

For my poem today, I decided to give Michelle Barne's Ditty of the Month a go. This month, the challenge was to pull one line from one of the poems Michelle shared and create a golden shovel poem. You can read her post and selected poems here.

Your Time Is Up
-a Golden Shovel from the 13th line of Tyrone Bitting’s poem, Truth

Pack your bags. Go on, Leave!
What do you want? A gold star? An “A”? 
I’m tired of your games. They’re messed-up
Brain games toying with my mind
I’m done with your abuse. Vamoose. Am I clear?

 After trying my own hand at one, I can't imagine writing a whole book of golden shovels! That's exactly what Nikki Grimes did in her award winning poetry collection, One Last Word:Wisdom from the Harlem Renaissance. In it, her golden shovel poems are paired with and inspired by poets of the Harlem Renaissance. I can't wait to check it out.


Until another week, poetry friends!

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

TUMBLE AND BLUE by Cassie Beasley - Middle Grade Book Review

(Dial Books, August 2017)

At a Glance


Genre(s):

Magical Realism, Adventure


Age Range: 

Middle Grade

Plot:

"When the red moon rises over the heart of the Okefenokee swamp, legend says that the mysterious golden gator Munch will grant good luck to the poor soul foolish enough to face him.

But in 1817, when TWO fools reach him at the same time, the night’s fate is split. With disastrous consequences for both . . . and their descendants. Half of the descendants have great fates, and the other half have terrible ones.

Now, Tumble Wilson and Blue Montgomery are determined to fix their ancestors’ mistakes and banish the bad luck that’s followed them around for all of their lives. They’re going to face Munch the gator themselves, and they’re going to reclaim their destinies." (source: Goodreads)

Strengths:

  • Absolutely beautifully written
  • The pacing is excellent - no slow parts
  • The magical part of the magical realism was woven so expertly that everything felt natural
  • The two main characters felt real and distinct
  • Munch, the gator
  • The opening!
  • The ending!

Weaknesses

  • It was over too fast (because I couldn't put it down--not an actual story flaw)

Would I recommend this title:

100% yes! 

Full Review

Every few years, I come across a book that leaps into my list of favorite books. I will proclaim my love for these books to anyone who will listen. Tumble and Blue is that type of book. 

First, let me talk a bit about much I enjoyed the actual writing in this book. I found myself repeatedly grinning from ear to ear at the beautiful prose. Now, I'm not saying it was flowery or gushy or showy. It was just a joy to read because of how well it was crafted. I knew after the first chapter that I wanted to slow down a bit and really enjoy the book.

Cassie Beasley's pacing was great throughout. I never felt like the story got bogged down (pun intended.) She did an excellent job at giving the reader just enough information to move the story forward, but left parts a mystery to be discovered later. 

And I loved Tumble and Blue. Both of these characters were vivid and fleshed out. Their problems were real, heartbreaking problems that most kids could empathize with.  I  also enjoyed all entire Montgomery clan and their crazy mishaps. 

One of the best parts about Tumble and Blue is that the emphasis of the magical realism is really on the realism part. Beasley doesn't rely on the fantastical parts of the story to dazzle and wow the reader. Instead, she is able to make everyday life in rural Georgia jump of the page. 

Tumble and Blue  was truly a delight to read. 

Monday, March 19, 2018

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? 3/19/2018

#IMWAYR


The weekly post where I recap some of the KidLit books I've been reading. Ocasionally, I'll also talk about some adult fiction books as well.

Be sure to check out Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers to see what other Kidlit readers are reading. Because, you know, we can never have too many books in our TBR piles.

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Picture Books

They All Saw a Cat
by Brendan Wenzel

This is an extremely clever and accessible way to teach children about different perspectives. And it is just all around fun. Definitely worth checking out!


Every Day Birds
written by Amy Ludwig VanDerwater
illustrated by Dylan Metrano

A wonderful read, this book introduces children to 20 common birds found in many places in the USA. The cutout paper illustrations are gorgeous and the back matter is excellent.


My Beautiful Birds
by Suzanne Del Rizzo

Suzanne Del Rizzo captures both the heartbreak and hope so many refugees carry. The mixed media illustrations are unique and help set this book apart. 


Rot: The Cutest in the World!
by Ben Clanton

I love it when a book is able to pull off a great unexpected ending. You know a twist is coming, but then it is executed in such a great and unexpected way. We all chuckled at this one and my 8yo daughter has reread it to her little brother multiple times.



2018 A to Z Challenge Theme Reveal


The April A to Z Challenge is only a few weeks away and I will be participating for the 1st time!

If you aren't familiar with the challenge, bloggers from all over the world will post 26 topics from A to Z throughout the month of April.

And today is the big Theme Reveal Day! Drumroll please!

.
...
.....
.......
.....
...
.

#Kidlit Short Stories with A to Z Words Chosen by My 8-year-old Daughter


I am so excited to participate in this fun challenge. Most of the stories will probably be closer to flash fiction, but there may be a few that go longer. I can't wait to start sharing them with you, so please be sure to come back on April 1st!



Friday, March 16, 2018

Poetry Friday - Happy St. Patrick's Day


It’s Friday! And you know what that means: Poetry! Want to know more about Poetry Friday? Click this link right here. And be sure to check out Linda's blog, TeacherDance, to see this week’s round up of wonderful poetry related posts, blogs and goodness. 
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Happy Poetry Friday, everyone! Tomorrow is one of my favorite holidays--St. Patrick's Day. Maybe it's because St. Patrick's Day is close to my birthday, or maybe it's because I make mounds of fried cabbage (no one else likes it but me!). But really I think it's because I like to make little green foot prints around the toilet bowl and dye the water green. I always get a kick out of my daughter being indignant that a leprechaun used our bathroom.

To celebrate, I am sharing another Shel Silverstein poem, The Search. I just finished reading Where the Sidewalk Ends to the kids and I love how fun reading his poetry aloud can be.

(c) Shel Silverstein
Orginally published in Where the Sidewalk Ends

I also have a bit of good news! Two of my poems that I wrote back in October for my Poetry Inktober challenge are being published by Spaceports and Spidersilk magazine later this year. I am especially excited because this will by my first time being published. So hooray for that!

Also, Donna over at Mainely Write piqued my interest in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge that starts in a few week. I am really excited to do my theme reveal this coming Monday, so be sure to come back and see what I have planned.

Monday, March 12, 2018

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? - 3/12/18

#IMWAYR


The weekly post where I recap all the KidLit books I’ve been reading. Occasionally, I’ll also review some adult fiction books as well.

Be sure to check out Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers to see what other kidlit readers are reading. Because, you know, we can never have too many books in our TBR pile.
                                         

Madness! Poetry is going on right now. If you're looking for a way to get more poetry into the classroom, check this awesome competition out.


Picture Books

Best in Snow
by April Pulley Sayre

I loved this book. The photos are breathtaking and the text is beautiful. It is done so well that I feel like I can hear the tinkling sound the falling snow makes. Simply stunning.


What to Do With a Box
written by Jane Yolen
illustrated by Chris Sheban

Jane Yolen is a master at rhyme and rhythm. I love the playfulness of this story. My 16-month-old will climb into any box he can fit (and even some that he can't). The illustrations are wonderful and look like they were actually painted on cardboard. The textures in the illustrations are great. 




Poetry

An Eyeball in My garden and Other Spine-Tingling Poems
selected and edited by Jennifer Cole Judd and Laura Wynkoop
illustrated by Johan Olander

I love anything spooky, so I obviously loved this collection of creepy poems. So often with anthologies, I find a few poems that I enjoy and then the rest are kind of just ho-hum. Not so with this collection. Was either genuinely creepy or funny-spooky. Perfect read aloud for the 7-10 age range (and beyond). The black and white illustrations also help to bring the poems to life. 


Friday, March 9, 2018

March Writing Updates and Goals

I feel like it has been a while since I did a writing update. The beginning of this year has been hectic. I cannot believe that it is already March. Where the heck does the time go?

While I could always be doing more, I feel like I have drastically increased how much I write compared to a year ago. I feel like consistency is a major key. I may only be able to write 500 words a day, but if I do that 5x a week for a month, that's over 10,000 words. I'm still not quite hitting that mark, but that's what I'm aiming at right now--500 words a day.

Here are a few of the things I'm proud of so far in 2018:

  • 2 picture book drafts completed
  • 1 picture book revision
  • 2 middle grade short story drafts
  • 31 poems written
  • 9 rejections (this is a good thing!)
  • Chosen to be authlete in Madness! Poetry
  • Active in 2 critique groups
  • completed round 2 judging for Cybils picture book/board book categories
  • Read 40 books (all but 8 were picture books)

And here are a few of my writing goals for this month:
  • write 1 new picture book manuscript
  • write 10 poems
  • revise 1 picture book
  • revise and submit middle grade short story
  • attend my critique groups
  • outline my chapter book so I can start writing it next month
  • continue to read good books

Poetry Friday - Spooky Recommendation


It’s Friday! And you know what that means: Poetry! Want to know more about Poetry Friday? Click this link right here. And be sure to check out the amazing Michelle Barnes' blog,  Today's Little Ditty to see this week’s round up of wonderful poetry related posts, blogs and goodness. 
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Hello and Happy Friday! Last week I was posting about the Madness Poetry beginning. This week I am posting about my Madness Poetry ending. I was up against a tough authlete, Myrna Foster, in the 1st round, and she out-poeted me.

 Our word was MAHOGANY and she did a suburb job with her poem. You can read our 1st round poems HERE. I don't know why, but I struggled with the rhythm of the word. Ah well. Good luck to Myrna in the next round.




It was fantastic. If you've even semi-regularly read my blog, you'd know that I love creepy, especially creepy-for-kids done well. And this collection does just that. Highly recommend!

Monday, March 5, 2018

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? - 3/5/2018

It's Monday! What Are You Reading?


The weekly post where I recap some of the KidLit books I’ve been reading. Occasionally, I’ll also review some adult fiction books as well.

Be sure to check out Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers to see what other kidlit readers are reading. Because, you know, we can never have too many books in our TBR pile.
                                         


Mouse
written and illustrated by Zebo Ludvicek

This is a delightful book. The illustrations are absolutely beautiful and the story is so much fun. Very inventive way to look at the letters of the alphabet. Highly recommend.



Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut
written by Derrick Barnes
illustrated by Gordon C. James

Another beautiful book. The detail in the illustrations is astounding. The rhythm of  the text is so perfect and it really pulls you right into the barber's chair. Highly recommend. 



Night Light
written and illustrated by Nicholas Blechman

I picked this book off the shelf on a whim and ended up loving it. The die-cut lights throughout the book are seriously fantastic. Great for little fingers and kids who are into vehicles. Recommend to anyone looking for an inventive counting book.




Friday, March 2, 2018

Poetry Friday - Snoop Dogg


It’s Friday! And you know what that means: Poetry! Want to know more about Poetry Friday? Click this link right here. And be sure to check out No Water River: The Chidlren's Poetry Place to see this week’s round up of wonderful poetry related posts, blogs and goodness. 
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It's that time of year again! Madness! Poetry is back. A year ago, I stumbled into the competition, applied and became an "authlete." Before that, I hadn't really written much poetry. And while I didn't start posting regularly with Poetry Friday here on the blog until July, the Madness! Poetry competition was the start of my love of writing poetry. So YAY for that!

I am so delighted to be participating again this year. Apparently, I even think about in my sleep. Last night, I dreamt that it was the big day of the 1st round of poems. But instead of being online, it was in person and set up more like a rap off, but for poetry. And my opponent was none other than Snoop Dogg. I was so worried because he was so good and everyone was there to hear him. I woke up laughing.

I think I've had rapping on the mind because my son is really into The Storybots right now. It's an educational show that sings rap-like songs to teach kids different topics. I am amazed at how well written the show and songs are. I really get a lot out of the rhythm and how much info they're able to pack into a single song. I've kind of been using it as "mentor texts" since my son wants to watch the over and over and over. Below is one of my favorites, but they are all great.




We Are the Planets
by the Storybots

We are the planets of the solar system
Different sizes for everyone
The music never ends
We are such good friends
And we all orbit the sun

Here comes the sun rapping first on this track from the beginning
I'm the center of the solar system
Planets be spinning around me
So hot
Im roasting you see
Now I pass the mic
To planet closest to me

Mercury the smallest planet
Small as earth's moon (yo!)
I get super hot and cold and I spin very slow

I'm Venus
I got mountains and volcanoes that spray
I'm the same size as Earth but spin the opposite way

I'm Earth
I'm the home to every boy an girl
Such beautiful, beautiful world

I'm Mars
The red planet I got deserts and ice
I got two moons, nice
That's like one moon twice

I'm Jupiter
The biggest planet
I'm humongous, gargantuan
I spin the fastest
Rap the fastest
Plus I'm handsome
Blam, son!

Oh please
I'm Saturn
Check out my beautiful rings
Made out of billions of rocks, dust and other things

I'm Uranus
I say that with pride
Okay, I lied
I'm embarrassed because I'm the only planet lying on it's side

I'm Neptune
I'm cold, dark, windy and mysterious
I'm vey stormy, so bring an umbrella
I'm serious!

We are the planets of the solar system
Different sizes for everyone
The music never ends
We are such good friends
And we all orbit the sun

Friday, February 23, 2018

Poetry Friday - Snow Gators


It’s Friday! And you know what that means: Poetry! Want to know more about Poetry Friday? Click this link right here. And be sure to check out Elizabeth Steinglass's blog to see this week’s round up of wonderful poetry related posts, blogs and goodness. 
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After a stint of having a tough time sitting down and writing, I feel like I am finally getting back into the swing of things. I am playing catch up a bit in the February Poetry Challenge, but I am determined to have 28+ poems by the 28th. 

This week I had the chance to share a piece of artwork from my own home. I chose a recent piece that my husband illustrated (you can see more of his work here, if you're interested). It was was so much fun to see everyone's ekphrastic poetry responses. You can see mine below.

illustration (c) John Herzog

Snow Gators

Snowbirds flock
To Florida
Each winter
And relax
On sunny beaches

But some folks
Scamper North
To frolic
In the snow. 
Are they snow gators? 
(c) Rebecca Herzog

Friday, February 16, 2018

Poetry Friday - Cherita


It’s Friday! And you know what that means: Poetry! Want to know more about Poetry Friday? Click this link right here. And be sure to check out Check It Out to see this week’s round up of wonderful poetry related posts, blogs and goodness. 
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This past week Carol Varsalona posted the art piece below as prompt for the February Poetry Challenge. The 1st poem is what I came up with originally while thinking of sleep training my son. I changed the last line as I have been pondering the shooting here in Florida (a few hours away from me). I am generally not an angry person and it takes a lot for me to really get upset. But today, I have nothing constructive to say, so I'll just leave you with my meager poems. 

(c) Bessie Pease Gutman

After bringing you home

Snuggles and cuddles
And gentle kisses.

Now its time
To sleep,
Pretty please? 


***

After bringing you home

Snuggles and cuddles
And gentle kisses.

No one should ever
Have to bury
Their own child.

Monday, February 12, 2018

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? - 2/12/18

#IMWAYR
The weekly post where I recap all the KidLit books I’ve been reading. Occasionally, I’ll also review some adult fiction books as well.

Be sure to check out Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers to see what other kidlit readers are reading. Because, you know, we can never have too many books in our TBR pile.
                                         


The Cybils round 2 judging has been taking up a lot of my book-reading attention lately--and I'm loving it. I am so excited for the winners to be announced on Wednesday. . Seriously, all the picture book and board book finalists were fantastic! It was hard to just choose one!


Dear Girl, A Celebration of Wonderful, Smart, Beautiful you!
written by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Paris Rosenthal
illustrated by Holly Hatam


A few weeks ago, I read Plant a Kiss by Amy Krouse Rosenthal. It was the first book of hers that I have ever read and I thoroughly enjoyed it. So I decided to read a few more of her books. This one came out just this past December and was brand new at the library. It did not disappoint. 

I think that this is the type of picture book that is appropriate for the entire age spectrum. I could have seen myself reading this to my squirming toddler to begin instilling a positive image early. I fell it is spot on for my daughter, who just turned 8, as she enters these pre-teen years and will soon be dealing with all sorts of inner and outer changes. I can see getting this book for a daughter who is graduating high school and getting ready to head off on her own.

The illustrations are just as beautiful as the text. The black and white characters with the splashes of color are fantastic. It is fun and cute and wonderful.  I would highly recommend this book. 



Friday, February 9, 2018

Poetry Friday - A Woman's Place


It’s Friday! And you know what that means: Poetry! Want to know more about Poetry Friday? Click this link right here. And be sure to check out the lovely Sally Murphy's blog to see this week’s round up of wonderful poetry related posts, blogs and goodness. 
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Happy Poetry Friday, everyone! After the stomach bug and then stalwartly sleep training my toddler (I would not wish either on my worst enemy), I finally feel like I have my bearings again. Yay!

I am having an absolute blast participating in Laura Shovan's February Daily Poem Project. Some days, the poems come a bit easier than others, but I am loving the practice and it is slowly becoming a habit. 

Yesterday, I wrote a poem based on this beautiful wood block print by Heather Meloche's grandmother, Thelma Wilson Brain. Heather shared that Thelma had been accepted to the University of Michigan, for Art and Fashion Design, but her father didn't let her go.

Wood block art by Thelma Wilson Brain
  
Originally, I wrote an almost-nonet to go with the piece (the 1st half of the poem below). Then Donna Smith suggested that I expand it into an hourglass-type format. I think it turned into a stronger piece because of her suggestion. I like it enough that I think I may keep reworking it a bit. 

A Woman’s Place

A woman’s place is in the forest
Feeling soft grasses under foot
Conversing with the sky lark
Listening to the world
Tasting ripe berries
Smelling blue bells
Seeing wonder
Existing
Present
Still
Present
Persisting
Seeing progress
Smelling victory
Tasting aspirations
Listening to the voiceless
Conversing with the Dreamers
Feeling the triumphs and sorrows
A woman’s place is in the resistance
(c) Rebecca Herzog 2018

Friday, February 2, 2018

Poetry Friday - Losing My Head


It’s Friday! And you know what that means: Poetry! Want to know more about Poetry Friday? Click this link right here. And be sure to check out the lovely Donna Smith's blog, Mainely Write, to see this week’s round up of wonderful poetry related posts, blogs and goodness. 
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I am all discombobulated. Here it is, 10:30 at night and I have a panic. "Oh no! I only have an hour and a half until it's Saturday and it'll no longer be 'Poetry Friday'!" Commence scrambling to get my stuff together. After about 15 minutes of sitting at the computer, I realize that it is still Thursday. Duh.

The stomach bug arrived at our home this past week and it decided to take no prisoners. I think we're out of the thick of it, but, as outlined above, the days have run together and I'm still trying to figure out which way is up. But we managed to get out of the house for a bit today and actually see the sun.

I have been reading through Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein. Last month, I got to hear Lee Bennett Hopkins speak, and he mentioned Shel and some of his background. It intrigued me. I'd love to read a biography on Shel at some point, but for now, I am going through and rereading some of his poetry.   So I thought I'd share a few of his poems that were fitting for the past week.

(c) Shel Silverstein

Sick

“I cannot go to school today,"
Said little Peggy Ann McKay.
“I have the measles and the mumps,
A gash, a rash and purple bumps.
My mouth is wet, my throat is dry,
I’m going blind in my right eye.
(read the rest of the poem here)

(c) Shel Silverstein

The Loser

Mama said I'd lose my head
if it wasn't fastened on.
Today I guess it wasn't
'cause while playing with my cousin
it fell off and rolled away
and now it's gone.



Monday, January 29, 2018

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? - 1/29/2018




The weekly post where I recap all the KidLit books I’ve been reading. Occasionally, I’ll also review some adult fiction books as well.


Be sure to check out Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers to see what other kidlit readers are reading. Because, you know, we can never have too many books in our TBR pile.
                                         

This past week I've been taking care of sick kiddos and now I have got the stomach bug too. So a short list for this week.


Picture Books

Plant a Kiss
written by Amy Krouse Rosenthal
illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds

Like so many picture books, I grabbed this one off the shelf because of the cute cover. I thoroughly enjoyed it. The cute illustrations have actual glitter! And rhyme in pictures can be a tough thing to get right. Amy Rosenthal did an amazing job and was a joy to read aloud to the kiddos.



Sad, the Dog
written by Sandy Fussell
illustrated by Tull Suwannakit

I picked this one up because we are a house full of dog people. I liked that the story was from the perspective of the dog and how his interactions with people shaped how he viewed himself. Overall, a good story. 

Friday, January 26, 2018

Poetry Friday - A Lesson Learned


It’s Friday! And you know what that means: Poetry! Want to know more about Poetry Friday? Click this link right here. And be sure to check out Carol Varsalona's blog, Beyond LiteracyLink, to see this week’s round up of wonderful poetry related posts, blogs and goodness. 
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So I learned something valuable today. Always read your poetry out loud. I have just a short window in the afternoons to work while my son is napping. Add a sick 7yo home from school and that time shrinks even more. I had a goal to finish a particular poem and send it off for a contest today. I worked and reworked the poem until I had it where I thought I wanted it. The meter was decent, the rhyme scheme worked. So, after one final (silent) read through, I sent it off.

Feeling pretty good, I was excited to read it to my husband when he got home from work. Let's just say that the rhythm that I thought I had created was all over the place, and that's putting it nicely. Ah well live and learn. But you betcha I'll be reading things out loud more often! 

The February Poetry Project starts next week, but we all started with warm ups today. The project's theme is "Ekphrastic at Home". Members will take turns posting an art piece found in their own homes and everyone will write a poem based on how the piece inspires them. My goal is to not miss a single day in February. Below you can find my poem for today's warm up. 


Oil on Canvas by Joy Dickson
Response to Portrait by Joy Dickson

My world grows dim
Like an oil slick
Suffocating life and light
Until no hope is left

But her soft touch 
Skims cross the pain
Removing greasy darkness
Till rays of hope return

(c) Rebecca Herzog


Monday, January 22, 2018

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? - 1/22/2018


The weekly post where I recap all the KidLit books I’ve been reading. Occasionally, I’ll also review some adult fiction books as well.


Be sure to check out Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers to see what other kidlit readers are reading. Because, you know, we can never have too many books in our TBR pile.
                                         

Picture Books


The Twelve Days of Christmas in Florida
by Frank Remkiewicz

I recently attended a writing conference where Frank Remkiewicz was attending, so I wanted to read one of his books. This was a really fun read. Frank actually lives in the next town north from me, so many of the settings in the book were local. I liked the humorous "12 Days of Christmas" format (12 panthers purring, 11 grannies golfing...) but I also enjoyed the nonfiction parts as well. Each day has a letter from the main character's cousin where he describes some factual things about Florida. 


My Father Knows the Names of Things
written by Jane Yolen
illustrated by Stephane Jorisch

To celebrate Jane Yolen's 365th book being published, I have set a goal to read at least 24 of her books. I enjoyed My Father Knows the Names of Things. the illustrations are fun and whimsy and and the text is fun.

How Do Dinosaurs Say I'm Mad
written by Jane Yolen
Illustrated by Mark Teague

 My children love ever iteration of the How Do Dinosaurs books. Mark Teague does a fantastic job of drawing all the different dinosaurs. I imagine that my son will like these more and more as he gets older. Jane's rhythm is spot on, as always. 


You Forgot Your Skirt, Amelia Bloomer
written by Shana Corey
illustrated by Chesley McLaren

I had no idea that this was a nonfiction book when I picked it off the shelf. I liked the illustrations on the cover and grabbed it. I had no idea where Bloomers came from before reading this, but I do now. I enjoy reading books with my daughter about women who bucked current trends and struck out on their own. Good overall read.